Monday, October 16, 2017

Note to Readers




Due to life changes and other commitments, this blog will only be randomly up-dated.

The Blog Roll will continue to update as other bloggers post new items, but I will not be blogging as regularly as before.


In the meantime, Rabbi Glazerson has a Torah Code showing Nibiru 5778


Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Tasty Fruit Trees


Photo: Even Liu



by Rabbi Chanan Morrison

The account in the Torah describing Creation and the beginnings of mankind is not particularly encouraging. We read of Adam’s sin, the murder of Abel, the origins of idol worship, the corrupt generation of the Flood, and so on.

The Kabbalists used the term shevirat ha-keilim, breaking of the vessels, to describe the many difficulties that occurred in the process of creating the world. With this phrase, they wished to convey the idea that the limited physical realm was incapable of accepting all of the spiritual content that it needed to contain. Like a balloon pumped with too much air, it simply burst.

The Midrash [Breishit Rabbah 5:9] relates that these failings were not only with the human inhabitants of the universe, but also with the heavenly bodies (a power struggle between the sun and the moon) and even with earth itself. The “vessels broke” on many different levels.

What was the “rebellion of the earth”?

God commanded the earth to give forth “fruit trees producing fruit” [Gen. 1:11]. The earth, however, only produced “trees producing fruit” [Gen. 1:12]. God’s intention, the Midrash explains, was that the trees would be literally fruit trees - i.e., the taste of the fruit would be in the tree itself. Were one to lick the bark of an apple tree, for example, it would taste like apple.

What does this mean? Why should the trees taste like their own fruit?

Appreciating the Path

Rav Kook explained that the Midrash is describing a fundamental flaw of nature. One of the basic failings of our limited world is that we are unable to appreciate the means - the path we take towards a particular goal - as much as we value the goal itself. We set for ourselves many goals, both short-term and long-term; and we are usually excited, even inspired, by the vision of accomplishing our final objectives. But how much exhilaration do we feel in our laborious, day-to-day efforts to attain these goals?

A number of factors - the world’s material character, life’s transient nature, and the weariness of spirituality when confined to a physical framework - contribute to the current state of affairs, so that we can only sense true fulfillment after attaining the ultimate goal.

God’s intention, however, was that the soul would be able to feel some of the inspiration experienced when contemplating a sublime goal also during the process of achieving that end. This is the inner meaning of the Midrash: the means (the fruit tree) should also contain some of the taste, some of the sense of satisfaction and accomplishment that we feel in the final goal (the fruit).

In the future, the flaws of Creation will be corrected, including the sin of the earth. The world’s physical nature will no longer obstruct the resplendent light of the ideal while it is being accomplished through suitable means. Then we will be able to enjoy genuine awareness of the ultimate purpose that resides within all preparatory activity.

Source: Gold from the Land of Israel - Adapted from Orot HaTeshuvah 6:7

Sunday, October 8, 2017

Yahrzeit: Rebbe Nachman of Breslov: 18 Tishrei


Rebbe Nachman of Breslov's histalkus [ascent from the body] took place in Uman, a Ukrainian town in Kiev oblast, on the 18th of Tishrei, which is the second day of Chol HaMo'ed Succos, 5571 [Oct. 16, 1810]. According to his express wish, Rebbe Nachman was buried in the old Jewish cemetery, together with more than 20,000 martyrs of the Haidamack massacres of 5528 [1768]. His surviving family members included his second wife, who built over his grave the original Ohel [a wooden structure to accommodate those who wished to pray nearby]; his daughters Adel, Sarah, Miriam, and Chaya; and several grandchildren. According to one tradition, the Rebbe's father, Rabbi Simcha, survived him, as well. 

It is customary for Breslover Chasidim to gather together on "Chai Tishrei" in order to commemorate the Rebbe's Yahrzeit. As is commonly the case in the Breslov community, there are no special minhagim [customs] associated with this event, other than lighting a Yahrzeit candle, giving Tzedakah [charity] in Rebbe Nachman's memory, and engaging in the study of Rebbe Nachman's writings.

To read and learn Rebbe Nachman's teachings, click on the REBBE NACHMAN label below this post.

That Moon ....



The moon on Friday night was absolutely incredible, did anyone else see such a huge moon?

Here's a photo of what we saw in Sydney [obviously not taken by me] - it was the biggest looking moon I've seen for a very long time. 

I hope you're enjoying Succot, I'll be back after the Chag iy""H.

Photo: Bondi Harvest - Moon rising over Bondi

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

The Tikkun of David

David rectified the soul of Adam through the Torah of Moshe

by Rabbi David Hanania Pinto


  “Torah tziva lanu Moshe morashah kehillat Yakov – The Torah that Moses commanded us is a legacy for the congregation of Jacob” [Devarim 33:4]

The entire Torah is attributed to Moshe Rabbeinu, as it is stated [Malachi 3:22] “Zichru Torat Moshe avdi – Keep in remembrance the teaching of Moses.” Chazal Add that the parashah of “Vezot Haberachah” is specifically named after Moshe Rabbeinu, a”h, because of the pasuk written in it, “Torah tziva lanu Moshe – The Torah that Moshe commanded us.”

Parashat “Vezot Haberachah,” which is named after Moshe, is read on Simchat Torah, right after Hoshana Rabba, which is attributed to King David.

What is the connection between King David and Moshe Rabbeinu that the festival attributed to King David is followed by the reading of the parashah attributed to Moshe?

We may explain that King David loved the holy Torah immensely, as it is stated in Tehillim [119:97] “How I love Your Torah! All day it is my conversation,” and Moshe Rabbeinu symbolizes the Torah, since he risked his life in order to bring it down from heaven and give it to Bnei Yisrael.

One who delves into the matter will notice that the initials of David and Moshe have the same gematria as “Adam,” (together with the kollel – adding one for the name itself). As we know, Adam HaRishon granted King David 70 years of his 1000 year life-span, after seeing that David was destined to die on the day he was born. Since he took pity on the lofty neshamah, he decided to grant it 70 of his years. It thus follows that King David, who completed Adam’s years, thereby corrected the soul of Adam, who had sinned in the Tree of Knowledge.

How did David succeed in correcting the soul of Adam? By learning the Torah, which is attributed to Moshe Rabbeinu.

We find, therefore, that Moshe Rabbeinu also had a part in correcting the soul of Adam, since without the Torah, which is called by his name, King David would not have been able to correct the sin of the Tree of Knowledge. This, then, is the connection between King David and Moshe Rabbeinu, and in the merit of both of them, the soul of Adam HaRishon received its tikkun and was cured.

It is truly amazing! The seventh day of Sukkot [Hoshana Rabba] is attributed to King David, and on the following day of Simchat Torah, we finish reading the Torah, discussing the death of Moshe Rabbeinu. Then we immediately begin reading Bereishit, in which we read about the creation of the world and about Adam HaRishon. Thus, we see a clear connection between King David, Adam and Moshe.

Thursday, September 28, 2017

The Difference Between Children and Adults



I've blogged this before, but it's very timely and also one of my favourites.  Send it to someone who needs to hear it before Yom Kippur.



Lekach: Segula for Parnossa



Lekach is a sweet cake, traditionally made with honey.  It is customary to ask for and receive "lekach" from someone [usually one's mentor or parent] on the day before Yom Kippur.   One of the reasons given for this custom is that if it had been decreed, G‑d forbid, that during the year we should need to resort to a handout from others, the decree should be satisfied with this asking for food.

The Lubavitcher Rebbe used to hand out Lekach each year on erev Yom Kippur, or for those who did not receive it then, on Hoshannah Rabbah.

To read more about the reasons for this custom, click here.

Below is my recipe for a Rosh Hashanah chocolate honey cake, which is incredibly easy to make, you just place all the ingredients in a bowl, mix, and bake.

These quantities make a very large cake, or two smaller cakes.  Note: this is a very large cake, you may want to halve the ingredients and make two loaf cakes instead.

One Bowl Chocolate Honey Cake

500g honey
3 eggs
One and a half cups sugar [I use raw caster sugar]
3/4 cup oil [I use lite olive oil]
1 teaspoon vanilla essence            
3 cups self-raising flour*
One and a half cups water
3 tablespoons of cocoa powder

Place all ingredients into electric mixing bowl, beat until well combined. The mixture appears to be too liquid, but don't worry, that is how it's meant to be.  Pour into large foil tray [or two smaller cake tins] and bake for approx 75 mins [large size] or 55 mins [smaller cakes] at 350°F - 180°C.  Cooking times may vary depending on your oven.

*If you are using general purpose flour, you will need to add a teaspoon each of baking powder and bicarb soda.  I prefer the convenience of self-raising flour.

Also see The Healing Powers of Apples and Honey

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Hurricanes, Quakes and now the Volcanoes


Catastrophe has struck the Pacific 'Ring of Fire' with flights carrying extra fuel in case of a major volcanic eruption, more than 75,000 people fleeing a Balinese region and the possibility of the evacuation of an entire island in Vanuatu 


Mass evacuations and states of emergency declared in Bali Indonesia and in Vanuatu [a small island near Australia]

Seems like all the popular vacation spots are being wiped out.

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

5778 is Upon Us



This is perhaps one of the most incredible things I've read on the internet.   I'm not even sure if the website is regarded as ''kosher'' - but the information contained is actually mind-blowing.

Here is an extract:


Text by Jeffrey [Ezra] Meiliken

The year 5778 is finally upon us and the entire world has been witnessing the changes over the past year with the ominous signs recognizable to all.

For 5778 years the Earth has been circling the Sun at 66,600 miles per hour, or 107,000 kilometers per hour if you use that system.

Most people will recognize 666 as an apocalyptic sign but be that as it may, it is also a deep Kabbalistic concept and the numerical value of 2/3.

Rav Ashlag of blessed memory used that principle to determine the year of 5778 as the time of the geula (final redemption), and the Arizal hinted at its use to determine a specific date within the year 5778.

Equally significant is that the sum of the integers from 1 to 107 is also 5778 and that there are 107,000 letters in the Torah preceding the 10 Commandments, which were given in the 70th Chapter in the Torah, but that has already been written.

Since the beginning of consciousness, the biblical birth of Adam, the Earth has been hurtling through space at 66,600 miles per hour, and when it traveled exactly 1,666,666,666,666 miles, King David was born. 35 years later, at the midpoint in David’s 70-year lifespan, in the year 2889 HC, we reached exactly the midpoint to the year 5778. Let that sink in for a moment, and connect to the journey that began with Adam, paused with David, and brought us to this fateful point in time. The ancient kabbalists told us that ADAM (אדם) stands for Adam-David-Moshiach(א–ד–ם).

Continue reading: click here

for a critique on this article  see Mashiach is Coming in 5778 - or is He?

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Shana Tova 5778




Wishing everyone a Shana Tova and hopefully with no unwelcome guests like Maria....  I'll be back after the Chag but right now I have a lot of cooking to do.   Chag Sameach !